"Je m'en vais, mais l'État demeurera toujours."
fuckyeahhetalianhistory:

Title: Cavalry of the Commonwealth Artist: rainy_takakoCharacter(s) or Pairing(s): Lithuania + PolandRating: GSummary: Based off the Polish Hussar uniforms, the army of the Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth rides to battle~
I think I will do like a Poland tribute… but that’s going to be way later. So I’ll be stocking up on Poland stuff till then. ;D

fuckyeahhetalianhistory:

Title: Cavalry of the Commonwealth
Artist: rainy_takako
Character(s) or Pairing(s): Lithuania + Poland
Rating: G
Summary: Based off the Polish Hussar uniforms, the army of the Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth rides to battle~

I think I will do like a Poland tribute… but that’s going to be way later. So I’ll be stocking up on Poland stuff till then. ;D

bluejamjar:

soon

bluejamjar:

soon

breefolk:

wonderdave:

heathyr:

ursamajor:

"Mildred Reed is his first-great-grandmother on George Washington, and on Obama, Mildred Reed is his tenth-great-grandmother."
- BridgeAnne d’Avignon, 12-year-old genealogist

I know, six months late to the party, my mind is still blown. All US presidents except Martin van Buren are descended from John Lackland Plantagenet. Yes, that John Lackland Plantaganet. Yes, all US presidents as of 2013.

12-Year-Old Discovers All U.S. Presidents Are Direct Descendants of King John Of England (by CONTAGIONNEWSdotcom)

image

Previous researchers didn’t figure it out because buying tampons is really embarrassing for dudebros.

This is neat, but I should point out that she’s not the first to point this out. A number of genealogists have said this.

Scanlation: Magic Words for Denmark

hetarchive:

The wonderful hikari kaitou scanlated the comic from Himaruya’s blog!

Original | LJ | Hetarchive

image

Read More

Comic: “Early in the morning of 30 January 1658, the [Swedish] army was lined up to cross theLittle Belt to reach Funen. The army consisted of about 9,000 cavalrymen and 3,000 foot soldiers. The ice warped under the weight of the soldiers; on occasions water reached up to the men’s knees. Close to the shore of Funen a skirmish broke out with about 3,000 Danish defenders, but these were brushed aside quickly and the army was safe on Funen.” (wiki)

1st Picture: Prussia and Russia - Battle of the Ice

2nd Picture: Poland and Lithuania - “During the Second Northern War, King Charles X Gustav of Sweden was bogged down in his war with Poland, unable to reach a decisive conclusion to the hostilities despite taking Warsaw. King Frederick III of Denmark provided a way out of Poland when he declared war on Sweden.” (wiki)

I want to correct you on something really badly but you posted it a year ago so I feel like that would be stupid.
Anonymous

Well, we’re kind of on an unofficial hiatus but feel free to reblog with corrections and we’ll reblog your commentary~!

chevalierviolet:

I had to make one no matter what happens.
Because D-Day.
I promise I’ll make legit art soon. Soon.

chevalierviolet:

I had to make one no matter what happens.

Because D-Day.

I promise I’ll make legit art soon. Soon.

"L’Etat, c’est moi" - translation

losthitsu:

Further exploration of the Nations and their citizens concept from here.

(this is fanart, not Himaruya’s work)

image

image

image

Read More

fyeahpolrus:


January Uprising by ~Janemin
“The January Uprising (Polish: powstanie styczniowe, Lithuanian: 1863 m. sukilimas, Belarusian: Паўстанне 1863-1864 гадоў) was an uprising in the former Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (present-day Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, Latvia, parts of Ukraine, western Russia) against the Russian Empire. It began on 22 January 1863 and lasted until the last insurgents were captured in 1865.
The uprising began as a spontaneous protest by young Poles against conscription into the Imperial Russian Army, and was soon joined by high-ranking Polish-Lithuanian officers and various politicians. The insurrectionists, severely outnumbered and lacking serious outside support, were forced to resort to guerrilla warfare tactics. They failed to win any major military victories or capture any major cities or fortresses, but they did blunt the effect of the Tsar’s abolition of serfdom in the Russian partition, which had been designed to draw the support of peasants away from the nation. Severe reprisals against insurgents, such as public executions and deportations to Siberia, led many people to abandon armed struggle and turn instead to the idea of “organic work”: economic and cultural self-improvement.” (Wikipedia)

fyeahpolrus:

January Uprising by ~Janemin

“The January Uprising (Polish: powstanie styczniowe, Lithuanian: 1863 m. sukilimas, Belarusian: Паўстанне 1863-1864 гадоў) was an uprising in the former Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (present-day Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, Latvia, parts of Ukraine, western Russia) against the Russian Empire. It began on 22 January 1863 and lasted until the last insurgents were captured in 1865.

The uprising began as a spontaneous protest by young Poles against conscription into the Imperial Russian Army, and was soon joined by high-ranking Polish-Lithuanian officers and various politicians. The insurrectionists, severely outnumbered and lacking serious outside support, were forced to resort to guerrilla warfare tactics. They failed to win any major military victories or capture any major cities or fortresses, but they did blunt the effect of the Tsar’s abolition of serfdom in the Russian partition, which had been designed to draw the support of peasants away from the nation. Severe reprisals against insurgents, such as public executions and deportations to Siberia, led many people to abandon armed struggle and turn instead to the idea of “organic work”: economic and cultural self-improvement.” (Wikipedia)

saxony-aph:





“Just how widespread the truce was is hard to say. It was certainly not general—there are plenty of accounts of fighting continuing through the Christmas season in some sectors, and others of men fraternizing to the sound of guns firing nearby. One common factor seems to have been that Saxon troops—universally regarded as easygoing—were the most likely to be involved, and to have made the first approaches to their British counterparts. “We are Saxons, you are Anglo-Saxons,” one shouted across no man’s land. “What is there for us to fight about?” The most detailed estimate, made by Malcolm Brown of Britain’s Imperial War Museums, is that the truce extended along at least two-thirds of British-held trench line that scarred southern Belgium.” 




A friend drew this Christmas Truce picture for me. I saw this fantastic Hetalia GIF-set of Germany and England in 1914 and of course I read the article about it as well. It’s just a lovely story and it also makes me happy that Saxons were in big numbers involved. So I asked for a Hetalia drawing that also has Saxony in it and here we are. Thank you so much dear for drawing it!

saxony-aph:

“Just how widespread the truce was is hard to say. It was certainly not general—there are plenty of accounts of fighting continuing through the Christmas season in some sectors, and others of men fraternizing to the sound of guns firing nearby. One common factor seems to have been that Saxon troops—universally regarded as easygoing—were the most likely to be involved, and to have made the first approaches to their British counterparts. “We are Saxons, you are Anglo-Saxons,” one shouted across no man’s land. “What is there for us to fight about?” The most detailed estimate, made by Malcolm Brown of Britain’s Imperial War Museums, is that the truce extended along at least two-thirds of British-held trench line that scarred southern Belgium.”


A friend drew this Christmas Truce picture for me. I saw this fantastic Hetalia GIF-set of Germany and England in 1914 and of course I read the article about it as well. It’s just a lovely story and it also makes me happy that Saxons were in big numbers involved. So I asked for a Hetalia drawing that also has Saxony in it and here we are. Thank you so much dear for drawing it!

livinglavidalokah:


aphcircle:


The Human Touch: Hetalia Bridges the Gapby Bad
What I’ve found is that sometimes it’s hard for people to get excited about history. Many feel like history is an impersonal subject and that countries are just lines on a map. And that’s because many people can’t connect with history because history lacks a personal touch—a human touch.
For a government class, I have to do a reading on The History of the Peloponnesian War. I don’t want to read that. It’s not a long reading, but it’s more than two pages, so it gets a big “nope” from me.
And as I was looking through this textbook, I found myself wishing there were Hetalia characters that directly represented Sparta and Athens, so that maybe I would actually enjoy the reading a little bit.
See, Hetalia creates that “human touch” that history usually lacks. Hetalia gives a human face and human emotions and human ambitions to a country that before was simply a geographical location. Hetalia bridges the gap between historical events and what it means to be a person with feelings and desires.
Civil Wars are no longer just battles that tear a country part from inside, they are battles that tear a person apart from inside—battles that manifest in the inward struggle and conflict of a human being (the personification). And we, as other human beings, can relate to that.
It is one thing to read about the American Revolution in a history class. But it’s another thing to watch the Hetalia episode and physically see the pain on England’s face and have it hit you that this is hurting him. Your heart stops then aches when you think about how Russia—no, Ivan Braginsky—was left defeated and alone after the collapse of the Soviet Union. These images cause fans to suffer and feel in ways they probably would never have if they had merely read a historical summery out of a textbook. 
Hetalia was never a way to gloss over war or sugar coat history. Hetalia was a way to make you want to rip out your heart for things you didn’t give much thought before, to make you laugh and cry and feel sincere, profound emotions about historical events that barely mattered to you before.
Hetalia has always been, and will always be, a way to make history move you.


The problem with this post is that you have put first a fictional character before real people’s suffering.
Russia’s suffering is the suffering of a soldier, of a mother, of a father, of a son. If that isn’t human enough, I don’t know what to tell you.
I get what you’re saying, that history can be just a series of dates and names and battles. Maybe that’s just how history is conventionally taught. But this isn’t a problem of history itself. Because if you want human suffering, if you want something personal, history is the subject. Apart from literature, history is the subject of humans and about humans. This is a problem with how history is usually taught, not with the subject itself. I agree, it requires a more human touch. But it need not create a fictional persona when there are millions of people, real people, who were there, who met kings, who had mud up to their knees in trenches, who died to relate to.
“Hetalia was never a way to gloss over war or sugar coat history.” But you are, when you elevate a singular person’s experience over the experiences of millions. You are when you choose one face, one skin to embody a people who come from infinitely unique backgrounds. I agree, Hetalia is not meant to be treated as a serious vehicle of history. It can be a wonderful tool to help learn it. But it should never take history’s place or be superior to history.
All I am saying is that, if you want something real, something profound, something that will cleave your heart two, I guarantee you someone sometime was there, saw that, and wrote it down. I guarantee you there were loyalist parents and revolutionary children who were apt metaphors for the American Revolution. I guarantee you there were people’s whose stories could move to your knees, who would glorify the will and character of humanity.
Better yet, they are real.


Please do not let a fictional character supercede the reality of living, breathing people. The concern should not be that a fictional character suffered, the concern should be that people died.

livinglavidalokah:

aphcircle:

The Human Touch: Hetalia Bridges the Gap
by Bad

What I’ve found is that sometimes it’s hard for people to get excited about history. Many feel like history is an impersonal subject and that countries are just lines on a map. And that’s because many people can’t connect with history because history lacks a personal touch—a human touch.

For a government class, I have to do a reading on The History of the Peloponnesian War. I don’t want to read that. It’s not a long reading, but it’s more than two pages, so it gets a big “nope” from me.

And as I was looking through this textbook, I found myself wishing there were Hetalia characters that directly represented Sparta and Athens, so that maybe I would actually enjoy the reading a little bit.

See, Hetalia creates that “human touch” that history usually lacks. Hetalia gives a human face and human emotions and human ambitions to a country that before was simply a geographical location. Hetalia bridges the gap between historical events and what it means to be a person with feelings and desires.

Civil Wars are no longer just battles that tear a country part from inside, they are battles that tear a person apart from inside—battles that manifest in the inward struggle and conflict of a human being (the personification). And we, as other human beings, can relate to that.

It is one thing to read about the American Revolution in a history class. But it’s another thing to watch the Hetalia episode and physically see the pain on England’s face and have it hit you that this is hurting him. Your heart stops then aches when you think about how Russia—no, Ivan Braginsky—was left defeated and alone after the collapse of the Soviet Union. These images cause fans to suffer and feel in ways they probably would never have if they had merely read a historical summery out of a textbook. 

Hetalia was never a way to gloss over war or sugar coat history. Hetalia was a way to make you want to rip out your heart for things you didn’t give much thought before, to make you laugh and cry and feel sincere, profound emotions about historical events that barely mattered to you before.

Hetalia has always been, and will always be, a way to make history move you.

The problem with this post is that you have put first a fictional character before real people’s suffering.

Russia’s suffering is the suffering of a soldier, of a mother, of a father, of a son. If that isn’t human enough, I don’t know what to tell you.

I get what you’re saying, that history can be just a series of dates and names and battles. Maybe that’s just how history is conventionally taught. But this isn’t a problem of history itself. Because if you want human suffering, if you want something personal, history is the subject. Apart from literature, history is the subject of humans and about humans. This is a problem with how history is usually taught, not with the subject itself. I agree, it requires a more human touch. But it need not create a fictional persona when there are millions of people, real people, who were there, who met kings, who had mud up to their knees in trenches, who died to relate to.

“Hetalia was never a way to gloss over war or sugar coat history.” But you are, when you elevate a singular person’s experience over the experiences of millions. You are when you choose one face, one skin to embody a people who come from infinitely unique backgrounds. I agree, Hetalia is not meant to be treated as a serious vehicle of history. It can be a wonderful tool to help learn it. But it should never take history’s place or be superior to history.

All I am saying is that, if you want something real, something profound, something that will cleave your heart two, I guarantee you someone sometime was there, saw that, and wrote it down. I guarantee you there were loyalist parents and revolutionary children who were apt metaphors for the American Revolution. I guarantee you there were people’s whose stories could move to your knees, who would glorify the will and character of humanity.

Better yet, they are real.

Please do not let a fictional character supercede the reality of living, breathing people. The concern should not be that a fictional character suffered, the concern should be that people died.

aphcircle:



Our podcast ‘History vs. Fandom’ is going to launch really soon, we promise! We’ll have more information about that when we get closer to finalizing the first recording.
Where the Hell is Hetalia? will officially kick off in February. Be on the lookout for important information regarding this event!
We’ll be throwing a synchtube party two weeks from tomorrow on Friday, February 1st. Come join us for a night of watching great Hetalia videos and, of course, goofing off.
If you have any suggestions for an event we could go around/for Valentine’s Day, let us know. We’re always open to fun ideas.

aphcircle:

  • Our podcast ‘History vs. Fandom’ is going to launch really soon, we promise! We’ll have more information about that when we get closer to finalizing the first recording.
  • Where the Hell is Hetalia? will officially kick off in February. Be on the lookout for important information regarding this event!
  • We’ll be throwing a synchtube party two weeks from tomorrow on Friday, February 1st. Come join us for a night of watching great Hetalia videos and, of course, goofing off.
  • If you have any suggestions for an event we could go around/for Valentine’s Day, let us know. We’re always open to fun ideas.
Good morning and excuse me for this ask. I need help and I'm sure between your followers somebody may help me. I need informations, the most detailed possible, about kamikaze attacks and training. If somebody may help me, I'll be extremelly grateful!

Unfortunately, we’re not as familiar with the kamikaze as we would like to be. But if any of our followers are, please help them out?? Thank you

pyrrhiccomedy:

yourresidentginger:

Heh.

Myth!

Of course the US space program thought of using pencils. The problem with pencils was that the graphite pencil “leads” are quite brittle. On Earth, that’s not a problem; you can dust the chipped bits of grey stuff off your desk and carry on with your day. But in a low gravity environment, graphite splinters and particles float through the air, damaging delicate equipment and (cringe with me) getting into people’s eyes. Health and safety was the motivation behind the pressurized pens. And the Russians adopted them, too!

Art by: minuiko
For this fanfic:
Title:  Favorites By: wizzard890 and pyrrhiccomedy. Characters: England, America, Russia.Rating: PG-13.Summary: 1821 - arbitration of the Treaty of Ghent. England can’t decide if he wants to smack America more because he’s a demanding, upstart little ingrate, or to beat some sense into him for pursuing a friendship with Russia.

Art by: minuiko

For this fanfic:

Title:  Favorites 
By: wizzard890 and pyrrhiccomedy. 
Characters: England, America, Russia.
Rating: PG-13.
Summary: 1821 - arbitration of the Treaty of Ghent. England can’t decide if he wants to smack America more because he’s a demanding, upstart little ingrate, or to beat some sense into him for pursuing a friendship with Russia.

England and Netherland's relationship
England: Who does that upstart think he is? Of all the ungrateful ... I aid him against Spain and there he goes, usurping all the trade in my colonies!
Portugal: Congratulations, you've finally met someone who is as much of an asshole as you are.
England: ....... by God you're right. 8|a
Portugal: I'm sorry?
England: This could work to our advantage. B]
[One civil war and three Anglo-Dutch wars later --> The Glorious Revolution of 1688]
England: This is my best idea yet.
Netherlands: I'm not carrying you down the aisle.
[And so England finally managed to get a foothold in the Dutch-dominated merchant trade, as placing William III of Orange on the throne meant all Anglo-Dutch fleets fell under British command. After this, Dutch wealth began to decline, and dominance of world trade shifted to the fledging British Empire.]
Spain: What a dick.
[After which the Dutch became resentful and retaliated by supporting the American rebels prior to the American Revolutionary War.]
Portugal: Yes, like two dick peas in a dick pod. B|
[The Anglo-Dutch relationship wouldn't improve until the 1800s.]
Spain: Falling out of the dick tree and hitting every dick branch on the way down?
Portugal: Exactly like that.
[Nowadays, the UK and the Netherlands have a strong friendship and have been major economic partners since the end of WWII.]
England & Netherlands: B|b <3 /THE POWER OF FRIENDSHIP AND COLD HARD CASH
Spain & Portugal: ............. BT
England: What? 8|
Netherlands: B| ???
Spain: Ah, well ... 8D;;;
Portugal: It's nothing. (orz)
[How should I put this ... they are very much alike.]